As one of the more controversial figures in European football, Samir Nasri’s recent three-match ban issued by the French Football Federation comes as no surprise following his conduct at Euro 2012, but what it is indicative of is another ugly side to our beautiful game, and what the modern footballer has become.

We are all too aware having seen plenty of examples in recent months and years of what motivates a player of Nasri’s calibre these days. He has proven it himself, leaving Arsenal to join money-laden rivals Manchester City in the quest for personal successes last summer. Success no longer comes from loyalty, but from monetary value. With that, Nasri has now illustrated how the modern player is also now just as focused on their own image off the pitch than what they do on it.

Traditionally, scoring a goal of the magnitude Samir Nasri did against England in a Euro 2012 opener would have been met with jubilation, but instead the 25-year-old decided to use his opportunity in the spotlight to hurl abuse at French journalists who had previously questioned his professionalism. This is an all too inherent feature of the modern game, no longer is a goal a chance to celebrate with teammates and fans, but more a chance to announce yourself to millions of people tuning in.

Then, his tirade against a French a journalist following their defeat against Spain would have been the last thing the people of France would’ve wanted to hear. Having been disappointed by their team’s performance in Poland and Ukraine, the chance was there for Samir Nasri to take responsibility and look at what they had learned from their tournament; not take the heat off his team or individual performances by putting himself in the spotlight for an expletive outburst at a journalist, thus making different headlines away from what happened on the pitch at Euro 2012.

It also raises an issue of something that is frequently bought to the table when controversies hit football nowadays, of the example players are setting to people watching on. As misdemeanours are now just as frequently broadcast as a team’s or player’s successes, the professional role model that was common in football previously has been lost to players caught up in the circus of matters off the pitch.

The fact of the matter is; the ban will not affect Nasri as the French face missing him against Uruguay, Finland and Belarus. The deterrent of a ban makes no difference, as Nasri will probably still represent France immediately after his ban, and will most likely be included in every tournament squad for the foreseeable future. The potential that it could be followed by a fine also serves as no deterrent for misdemeanours, as the modern footballer earns such a substantial amount of money and the severity of fines is never enough to make any real impact.

The beautiful game may have lost its professionalism in recent years, and examples are now spilling into matters off the field just as much as on the field ever increasingly, and Samir Nasri is the most recent portrayal to the ugly side of footballers nowadays.

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  • Bill Glas
    2 years ago

    I don’t condone Nasri for his outburst, but I’d dearly love to know what these ‘sweet’ journos had done to provoke his ire. The stuff many of them write is often neither objective nor accurate.

    Reply
  • Robbo
    2 years ago

    The problem is that the public and media think they can say whatever they want about people that, despite how much they earn have real feelings and real personalities. You cry like an effing baby when they give a bit back. The media and people in general need to grow a bloody backbone. If you say nasty things about people then expect them to stick up for themselves you soft twat.

    Reply
  • Gary
    2 years ago

    Just a guess but is the author of this article an Arsenal supporter by any chance?

    Reply
  • Christian
    2 years ago

    I really hope you didn’t get paid for this article. Did you forget the small matter of him possibly leaving arsenal to win some trophies? I’m quite sure he won one in may.

    Reply
  • Maxxi
    2 years ago

    Oh Dear, Another ugly BITTER gonner side!!! A writer wannabe

    Reply
  • mancunian mike
    2 years ago

    I’d have to agree with the Bill Glas and Robbo posts. You can’t expect players to just take the cr@p you people write about them. You state that ‘examples are now spilling into matters off the field’…of course they are, because journo’s are no longer content to write about the game and the goals, they are writing about events off the field, prying into players private lives and questioning the motives of people they don’t personally know. The press slagged off Nasri when he went to City claiming it was only for money yet he won the title in his first season – will the press question RVP’s loyalty when he leaves Arsenal? The main problem, as usual, is the pathetic agenda of the media.

    Reply
  • Jerry
    2 years ago

    David-Donnelly, if you were offered the chance to do the exact same job but in an up-and-coming company who were willing to pay you more and offer you the chance for more recognition for your talents would you say “no, thanks, I’ll stay here”? I honestly doubt you would, you and everyone else would jump at the chance. People chance jobs and companies all the time, why is it only footballers who get abuse over it?
    Any wonder the guy doesn’t like journalists?
    Football journalists cannot give out about negative issues in football without first looking at how they, themselves contributed to those issues. Look in the mirror before chastigating someone else for doing what most people would have.

    Reply