The infectious power of Super Sunday

Over the last 20 years Sky have brought numerous fantastic self-promoted innovations to the football viewer, all in the name of making football bigger and better than ever before, but none are more timeless and successful than Super Sunday.

Perhaps I’m just a sucker for the endless hyping of the Premier League, but when I see a Super Sunday coming up I know I’ll be watching. Every couple of months the scheduling fates collide and throw up two mouth-watering clashes, then Sky whack them back to back on a Sunday and that’s it. Six hours of my day are locked down and I know there will be absolutely no need to leave the house.

The question ‘what are you doing this weekend?’ is instantly met with ‘well on Sunday I’m watching the football.’ It makes absolutely no difference what the weather’s like – why would you need to know when the pre-match build starts at one and the pundits round it all off at 7? It’s a glorious medley of sofa sitting, split up only by jumping up and down with delight, burying your face in your hands and the occasional pee.

Sunday is traditionally a day of rest so I have no qualms with the lie-in, late breakfast and build up routine. Bring on the completely over-the-top half hour of endless adverts and montages, at one o’clock on a Super Sunday I’m ready to soak it all in. Build build build, I’m not going anywhere. If it’s a glorious day outside I might open the back door, maybe.

I face the row of pundits, responding as though I’m in the studio, agreeing, contesting, scoffing, even laughing with the banter with a worrying over-familiarity. ‘Oh Jamie! How could you! Hahahaa..’ (Seems surprisingly camp reading that back!) I’m in the zone and it’s a great place to be.

Sky do a fantastic job of getting you excited about teams that you don’t support, playing games that won’t necessarily matter at all in the long run. Every game is HUGE, every decision is HUGE, even every advert is bookmarked with epic Sky voiceovers and shots of crowds going mad. It’s impossible not to get sucked into Sky’s distorted world in which football matters more than everything else put together.

At the end of it all, six hours later, you realise that you’ve actually just watched two football matches, not the most important events of all time. There’s also a high chance that next weekend you’ll do the same again, but there’s no time to dwell on that. Just have some dinner and settle back into that sofa groove. Match of the Day 2 starts at 10.

When I’m not watching football you can find me on twitter!/philipwroe tweeting about guess what….