Transfer Focus: Hull City’s plans for Kamil Grosicki are ridiculous

Hull City fans must be livid after reports emerged that the club were willing to let Kamil Grosicki leave on a free this summer in order to reduce the club’s wage bill.

The Polish winger is one of the star players at the KCOM Stadium having netted nine goals and provided 12 assists last campaign.

For the Tigers to allow him to leave for free, their financial situation must be worse than many initially thought.

Won’t be short of suitors

One thing is for sure, Grosicki won’t have a hard time finding a new club due to the form he has shown this year.

Indeed, any team in the Championship would be lucky to have a player of the Pole’s ability, but he may be headed for the Champions League next year, as potential Turkish champions Istanbul Basaksehir are apparently interested.

The Yorkshire club will certainly miss the winger, but it seems as though there are set to be massive cutbacks at the KCOM Stadium this summer as their parachute payments end.

Ridiculous decision

With Jarrod Bowen also looking likely to leave Hull this summer, to let the 30-year-old go for free is a ludicrous decision.

Between them, the pair scored or assisted over half of their goals this season, and if they lose both players, then their squad will be wafer thin when it comes to quality talent.

If the Tigers are unable to pay Grosicki’s reported £25,000 weekly wage, then the club must be in terrible shape financially.

That amount isn’t a massive wage in the Championship, and if Hull can’t get a reasonable fee for Bowen, then they may well be in danger of being relegated next time around.

They were in big trouble early in the last campaign, but a significant turnaround in form which was largely sparked by their two wingers saw them clear of any relegation worries.

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If they are without their two key men next season, the Tigers will undoubtedly be a lot closer to the bottom of the table than the top.