Transfer Focus: Leeds building Spanish core with move for Rafa Mujica

In recent years we have seen teams promoted from the Championship when they have been built around a group of players from one specific nation.

Nuno Espirito Santo’s Wolves were built around Portuguese players, while Daniel Farke’s Norwich side had a plethora of German talent in their ranks.

With Victor Orta in charge of transfers at Leeds they have quietly been applying a transfer policy that favours the signings of Spaniards, and according to reports in Marca they may be set to add another in the shape of Rafa Mujica.

Who is he?

Mujica is a product of Barcelona’s famed La Masia academy, but now aged 20 he is yet to make a first-team appearance for the European giants.

He has played 63 games for the Catalan club’s B team where he has scored just 10 goals, so it seems that despite being a product of one of the best academies in the world Mujica is yet to make a real impact in his career.

This wouldn’t be the first time Leeds have looked towards Camp Nou when they have been looking for players. Kun Tumenzhukov came from Barcelona’s youth setup to Elland Road and has been brilliant for their U23s this season.

Have to be careful with this policy

With the links to Mujica and Ander Iturraspe, it seems increasingly likely that Leeds are looking to bring in more Spanish players this summer.

Kiko Casilla, Pablo Hernandez and Samu Saiz are already on the books at the Yorkshire club, and several other youngsters are in the reserves.

Orta’s Spanish influence is filtering into the first team, but the Whites must be careful when purchasing from one of the world’s great footballing nations.

Spaniards have often had a hard time settling in England the likes of Jozabed at Fulham, Vicente Iborra at Leicester and Nolito at Man City have shown that their talents often don’t translate over to the English game.

Leeds have already fallen victim to this problem as Saiz had to go out on loan in January due to homesickness after a fantastic first season with the club.

The policy could work wonders for the Whites, but they mustn’t put all their eggs in one basket as it may backfire.