Are these worst Tottenham Kits of our time?

Let’s face it, every club has had some dodgy kits down the years, and Spurs are no different. Tottenham at least never allowed their players to design their own kits like former Mexico goalkeeper Jorge Francisco Campos Navarrete, but over the years, I wish they had.

Tottenham’s insistence that every year they release at least 3 different kits for supporters to pay outrageous sums for, has led to designers coming up with some real eyesores in the name of creativity.

The most upsetting thing about this article however, is not that these kits were manufactured, but that I owned most of them…
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5 – The worst thing about this shirt, was that we actually had it as our third kit for 3 years. Really Le Coq Sportif is responsible for the colour, as despite having absolutely nothing to do with the clubs heritage, between 1982 and 1986 Le Coq Sportif released three sky blue kits. However, Umbro really took liberties when they designed this abomination in 1991. The worst thing about the kit is the fact that it has SPURS dripping down the front, just in case the fans forgot who they were watching, or the players needed prompting when picking out a pass. Awful kit.
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4 – Apparently, this ‘gold’ number was harking back to the golden brown colours the clubs wore as their second strip between 1899 and 1901. Historically, Tottenham wore a striped gold and brown number against a German XI in January 1901. Well guess what Puma, it isn’t 1901 anymore. I don’t know what passes as a nice shirt in Nuremberg or wherever your designers reside these days, but no more muddy brown shirts please. Thanks.
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3. As modelled by the lovely Espen Baardsen, this goal keeper’s kit was just one in a long line that could have made this list. Ian Walker wearing a bright green number also springs to mind, but there are too many to recall here, so let’s focus on this one for now.

Why orange? That’s all I really want to know. Since when has orange been part of the clubs heritage, spliced with sky blue and yellow? Spurs conceded 56 goals the season the Ian Walker and Espen Baardsen wore this in the 1997/98 season, so it obviously wasn’t putting off the opposition. In short, one of the worst goalkeeping jerseys with had, but to be fair, there’ve been a few.
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2. Pony has a lot to answer for, but their most hideous crime was introducing the cult of the purple Tottenham away shirt. In 1995/96, 1998/99 and 2003/04 Tottenham inexplicably decided to opt for purple away shirts. This one, enters the top 5 not only due to it setting the trend, but also because it had that annoying Pony collar that faded if you put it in the wash too often… not that I wore it.

I can’t guarantee it, but it was probably shirts like this that made Sheringham leave. Thanks Pony. I gave you people far too much money.
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1. Ok it’s time to get old school… There was a time, believe it or not, when Tottenham were not the best team in the Premier League, and weren’t actually even in the top tier of English football. I’m sorry, but getting relegated is no excuse for this ‘experiment’. Tottenham introduced this shirt in 1977, in time for their season spent outside the top flight in the old Division 2. Tottenham should have been relegated for this shirt alone.

The colour can be described as off-yellow, but in truth, it just looks off. The kit was designed by Admiral, only the second brand to earn the right to design for Tottenham after Umbro. It is not difficult to see why their contract was not renewed. Equipped with matching shorts and socks, this is possibly the worst Tottenham kit of all time…