Hardly represents a deterrent to a team like Manchester United

Football FanCast guest columnist Geoff Cooper cannot believe FIFA's way of stamping out poaching, going forward, is simply to increase the fines.

When Chelsea were banned for the poaching of Gael Kakuta I applauded the decision, as it is only right the bigger clubs get punished for their roughshod tactics and the exploitation of lesser teams. It appeared to me that FIFA had finally grown some balls; how wrong was I?

There is no doubt in my mind that imposing these sanctions on Chelsea was the best thing for FIFA to do in order to crack down on clubs and instil some power over them. You hear the likes of Blatter continually talking about attempting to clean up the game and while he had the golden opportunity to do so, it appears that the ban on Chelsea is likely to be a one off as they impose their new compensation policy's going forward. In many ways Chelsea have good reason to feel slightly disappointed and I am sure that they'll make it known at an appeal, in which it appears likely that they will be let off.

So how have FIFA look to tackle this issue, something that both Manchester clubs have been accused of in the past few weeks…yeah, let's just increase the compensation that these incredibly rich football clubs will have to pay out, that will be the solution to the problem. It amazes me to be honest and just shows the lack of backbone this organisation has.

According to reports in the Times FIFA's new ruling states that clubs found guilty of poaching players have seen the compensation figure rise from £118,000 to £410,000, providing a 16yr-old had spent five seasons being trained in his own country. This figure rises to £490,000 and then £572,000 if the players are brought in to the offending clubs as 17 and 18-year olds respectively. Hardly a deterrent is it, especially when those kind of figures are a drop in the ocean for clubs like United.

 

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