Why this Chelsea striker might follow ex-Liverpool man to Barcelona

The press, contrary to what Diego Costa and Luis Suarez believe, loves a fiery South American centre forward. Ok, so maybe Costa isn’t technically South American anymore, although his competitive nature is often attributed to his Brazilian upbringing.

For those who are not already aware, Costa represented Brazil at international level, before handing in a transnational transfer request by claiming Spanish citizenship in 2013 and subsequently played for Spain at the 2014 World Cup.

Luis Suarez has stuck to his roots and continues to play for his beloved Uruguay. The two Latin Americans possess a competitive nature not often found in English football, a do or die attitude that isn’t brave, but menacing. Suarez and Costa are the antithesis of the heroic English centre-half, and they are vilified in the Premier League as a result.

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Costa is undeniably a wonderful footballer; the Spanish international was a vital part of Chelsea’s title winning team last season, although his controversies have overshadowed his performances this season. The former Atletico Madrid man has a tendency to provoke defenders in an attempt to gain a man advantage over the opposition. Such tactics are considered to be dishonest in the Premier League, although in Spain’s La Liga, the art of getting an opposing player sent off is widely supported.

Like Suarez before him, Costa is in the middle of a Premier League culture clash. He tussles and fights with his opposing defenders as a matter of principle, although to the spectators, his actions are just petulant.

In England we applaud the very simple aspects of the game, such as; work ethic, courage and leadership. The so-called connoisseurs of football in the terraces, or from the armchair, separate the workhorses from the rest of the team, as though those players who are outwardly brave and English put those who are shrewd and South American to shame.

Fans all over the country are still clinging onto this agenda that old school English footballing principles still have a place in the modern game, and England’s failure to adapt has hurt them dearly in international football over the years.

Costa and Suarez play on the edge, as they probably would have done when they were growing up. Why should we expect Costa or Suarez to change the way they play football just because they play in England? It’s a universal sport, and Costa and Suarez have proved many times in the past that their way works best. In South America, it’s not the Premier League, but La Liga or Serie A that promising players aspire to, which is why, sooner or later, Costa will move back to Spain like Suarez.

It has been reported that Barcelona are targeting a January move for Costa, when their transfer embargo has been replenished. If Costa continues to be vilified by the arrogance of the Premier League then he will no doubt take Barcelona up on their offer, and win many more trophies alongside Suarez, Neymar and Lionel Messi.

One thing is for sure; if Costa does move, it will be English football’s loss and La Liga’s gain.