Why this has been the worst Premier League season yet (so far)

Despite the best efforts of Sky, BT and Match of the Day, this season has been incredibly dull to date.

Unless you’re a Leicester City fan, there isn’t much for the Premier League supporters to get excited about. Most teams have fallen into their usual routines with the exception of Chelsea; their downfall would be interesting if Jose Mourinho wasn’t as monotonous and monotone as ever.

Chelsea’s title crown of 2015 was one of the most predictable in Premier League history; the league table only underwent a few minor changes throughout the season. There were no upsets, no shocks and there wasn’t a single discernible event or match to identify that dreary season with.

So far this season it has been business as usual. The promoted teams have started adequately before they predictably run out of steam towards the end of the season; the same can be said for West Ham, this time last year Big Sam was dreaming of a top four finish as well. Louis van Gaal’s army is still the most boring in Manchester, while Man City have as much likability as a newly formed MLS franchise.

Of course there have been a few changes. Liverpool’s new boss, Jürgen Klopp, has achieved the impossible by demonstrating more character than his predecessor Brendan Rodgers. Although so far The Reds are still amongst the top ten muddle, only time will tell if Liverpool will set this season alight.

The non-participation of Chelsea in this season’s title race has made for a mildly interesting sub-plot, and one that has rivaled David Moyes’ timid tenure at Old Trafford for comedy value.

However, the Premier League needs more than the managerial merry-go-round to make a season memorable.

The fundamental reason that this season has been so lackluster is due to the quality, or moreover, the excitement of the football being played. Most Premier League seasons are remembered for what happens towards the top of the table, and so far the linchpins of English football are uninspiring to say the least.

This is epitomised by the poor form of English teams in the Champions League, much like the national team, we have come to settle for a quarter-final finish at best. Want-away foreign stars, Eden Hazard and David de Gea are also symbolic of the pulling power of the Premier League, or lack of.

Perhaps the Premier League is in transition since its European domination less than 10 years ago. Maybe Sir Alex Ferguson left a greater void than initally felt by Man United.

However, the Premier League is marketed all over the world for its exciting brand of football and galaxy of stars. As soon as the entertainment value starts to diminish, one has to question the point in promoting this vacuous league at the expense of our national team.

There is still a long way to go this season, although unless things change soon, it will be another forgetful year for most fans of English football.