Ultimate XI: Vote for Celtic’s best right midfielder since Lisbon

The further forward that we move the harder it is to whittle things down, especially in midfield where most players can be used in two roles.

These days a right sided midfielder is expected to be exploding down the wing or even doubling up as a wing back.

From my own experience the classic three man midfield emerged in the early eighties with Paul McStay and Tommy Burns playing either side of Murdo MacLeod.

Four and five man midfields tend to be the fashion these days but for the purposes of this vote I’ll leave it at three to give us more attacking options to enjoy.

Over the last 50 years Celtic have been blessed with many fantastic midfielders, it wouldn’t have been a stretch to come up with ten candidates for each midfield position.

If your favourite isn’t listed he may have been moved inside for the central midfield role – as for left midfield, how many good ones do you require?

Have a look at our five candidates and cast your vote on the final page…

The team is based on players who have played since that afternoon in Lisbon, the Lions have been left out of contention for this vote.

STEVIE MURRAY

stevie-murray

Joined a great Celtic side in the early seventies and immediately slotted in alongside giants like Kenny Dalglish, Harry Hood, Bobby Lennox and Dixie Deans.

Murray possessed a great shot but also had the vision and mobility to make him very much the modern midfielder of the seventies.

He scored the goal at Brockville in ’74 that clinched nine-in-a-row and followed that up with another against Dundee United in the Scottish Cup Final, but opted out of the 1974 Scotland World Cup squad for personal reasons.

*Cast your vote on the final page…

SHUNSUKE NAKAMURA

Had the misfortune to arrive at Celtic on the back of the 5-0 defeat from Artmedia Bratislava but soon made his mark in Europe with a glorious and much celebrated free kick against Manchester United.

Japanese players had rarely ventured to the UK or Scotland but despite his slight frame Naka made a big impact on the Celtic side of Gordon Strachan.

To this day his impact can be seen through Kieran Tierney with his ability and dedication leaving a legacy with all who saw him in action.

*Cast your vote on the final page…

DAVIE HAY

davie-hay

Brilliantly named as the Quiet Assasin, Hay could play a bit but knew how to look after himself.

Any opponent that was putting it about a bit was likely to meet their match with Hay specialising in cementing players in a 50-50 with the unfortunate opponent likely to end up somewhere in The Jungle.

Although regularly used in defence he was at his best in midfield with his transfer to Chelsea shortly after the 1974 World Cup Finals a key factor in the club’s decline as a European force.

*Cast your vote on the final page…

LUBO MORAVCIK

Could have been nominated for any of the midfield roles and enjoyed an amazing Celtic career.

Who and why were the obvious questions when he was signed, after his first Glasgow derby he became the club’s best bargain since Henrik Larsson.

Lubo could do anything and everything with a ball, including trapping it with his backside.

He could score from any position, was completely two footed and was always capable of something special no matter how mundane things were around him.

If only he had been brought to Celtic a decade earlier…

*Cast your vote on the final page…

STAN PETROV

Stiliyan Petrov emotional

Was the lost Bhoy of the John Barnes era that flourished under Martin O’Neill.

Very much the modern midfielder he could play in any midfield role, tackled strongly and loved to motor box to box to test out goalkeepers.

He was a key figure on the road to Seville forming a great partnership with Paul Lennon and Neil Lambert, supplying the younger legs to his peers. When he was sold to Aston Villa there was a £4m profit for Celtic following six years of top performances.

Cast your vote below…

Have something to tell us about this article?
CLICK HERE